Griffin shadow Griffin axis Griffin thruster Griffin lander Griffin lander gray Griffin size

Frustrum Ring

Ideal for secondary landers, satellites, rovers, or other large payloads

Above Deck

Thermally Controlled

Below Deck

Thermally Controlled

Radial Stiffeners

Closer to the lunar surface

Griffin Lander

Cruise, orbit, and surface operations at any lunar destination


Overview


Griffin's flexible payload mounts can accommodate a variety of rovers and other payloads to support robotic missions like skylight exploration, sample return, regional prospecting, and polar volatile characterization.

Autonomous landing uses cameras, IMU, and LIDAR to safely land Griffin within 100m of any targeted landing site, even in rugged, hazardous terrain.

Griffin lander Griffin lander gray Griffin size

Avionics


Griffin’s avionics achieve terrestrial computing speed with high reliability. Rugged, radiation-tolerant computing enables autonomous landing with unprecedented precision and safety in the demanding environment of space.

Griffin lander

Structure


Griffin's aluminum frame is stout, stiff, and simple for ease of payload integration. The main isogrid deck accommodates flexible payload mounting on a regular bolt pattern. Four legs absorb shock and stabilize Griffin during touchdown. Rover missions use deck mounted ramps for rover egress.

Protoflight lander structure has been qualified for launch loads through vibration testing. These data are available upon request for payload design and planning.

Griffin lander

Payload Accommodations


Griffin's mechanical interface options accommodate a wide range of payload morphologies. Alternate mounting locations are available as a non-standard service.

For lunar mission on Falcon 9:
663 kg
payload mass to TLI
515 kg
payload mass to lunar orbit
270 kg
payload mass to lunar surface
Griffin lander Griffin lander gray

Frustum Ring

Ideal for secondary landers, satellites, rovers, or other large payloads

Above Deck

Thermally Controlled

Below Deck

Thermally Controlled

Radial Stiffeners

Closer to the lunar surface

Propulsion


Griffin has four tanks surrounding a main thruster. Four clusters of attitude control thrusters orient the craft. The main engine is concentric with the spacecraft central axis and performs capture, de-orbit, brake, and decent.

1,685 kg
fuel mass
3,237 m/s
delta-v
300 sec
main thruster ISP
Griffin axis Griffin thruster Griffin lander

Guidance Navigation & Control


The Griffin lander uses off-the-shelf sensors and common algorithms for navigation during cruise and orbit. It determines position and attitude from radio time-of-flight, Doppler, sun sensor, star tracker, and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU).

On approach to the Moon, Griffin switches to the Astrobotic Autolanding System, which uses proprietary techniques for precision navigation. Computer vision algorithms compare images from the lander's cameras with high- resolution NASA lunar surface images to determine the craft's position and attitude. As the craft nears the surface, it uses laser sensors to construct a 3-D surface model of the landing zone. It detects slopes, rocks, and other hazards and autonomously maneuvers to a safe landing.

20 cm
hazard detection threshhold
3 °
Slope detection accuracy

On-board navigation & control systems

Radio doppler Radio/
Doppler
Sun sensors Sun
Sensors
Star tracker Star
Tracker
Intertial measurement Intertial
Measurement
Landing cameras Landing
Cameras
Laser sensors Laser
Sensors
Griffin shadow Griffin lander

Think you want to fly?

Use our interactive mission design worksheet to experiment with destinations, specify your payload characteristics, and choose services. You can see the estimated mission cost and save your work for later refinement.

Configure your mission Cta arrow